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In Honor of all Ukrainian Heroes:

“Tire Afire – Горіла Шина | YouTube (3:28)

TIRE AFIRE – Many of the photos from the current unrest in Kyiv have been backlit by large piles of burning tires. This inspired a pulsating new Ukrainian rock song called “Horyt’ shyna,” or “Tire Afire.” It condemns security police who have fired on demonstrators in Kyiv, thugs hired to bash heads, and the corrupt leaders who have bankrupted Ukraine and its people. President Yanukovych is the leader of the Regions Party, whose members, according to the song, will all face a tribunal. The lyrics match the still photos, which end with a Ukrainian standard bearer and shot of vehicles on the road leading to President Yanukovych’s outlandishly expensive residence at Mezhyhirya, a former Ukrainian Orthodox monastery that was appropriated by the Bolsheviks and never returned. The video begins with a dedication to the heroes of Ukraine.

A tire was afire, blazing,
A tire was afire, blazing,
There stood a barricade,
There stood a barricade.

There stood a barricade,
There stood a barricade.
It would not let the wild dogs pass,
It would not let the wild dogs pass.

A tire was a fire, so was gasoline,
A tire was a fire, so was gasoline,
Firing from a distance was an SOB,
Firing from a distance was an SOB.

A tire was afire, a satchel also burned,
A tire was afire, a satchel also burned.
Oh, they’ve brought us thugs aplenty,
Oh, they’ve brought us thugs aplenty.

O my villains, o my cons,
O my villains, o my cons,
You’ve served me long enough.
You’ve served me long enough.

No longer will you serve me,
No longer will you serve me,
You’ll face a people’s court,
You’ll face a people’s court.

A tribunal will await,
A tribunal will await,
Each and every Regionaire,
Each and every Regionaire.

A tire was afire, blazing,
A tire was afire, blazing,
There stood a barricade,
There stood a barricade.

Music – by the People of Ukraine
Lyrics – by the People of Ukraine
Performed by Klofelin
Recorded & Mixed by Bodiax
Translated by Peter Fedynsky

www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVEUVgF1eUI&feature=youtu.be

​Bonus:

Ukrainian Music ​Fresh From the Maidan | courtesy of Ukrainian Roots Radio in Vancouver

‘Civilized future’ of Ukraine at stake, says acclaimed Ukrainian writer

January 29th, 2014 03:09 PM ET
‘Civilized future’ of Ukraine at stake, says acclaimed Ukrainian writer

under
By Mick Krever, CNN

After months of protests, the very “civilized” future of Ukraine is at stake, acclaimed Ukrainian writer Andrey Kurkov told CNN’s Hala Gorani, sitting in for Christiane Amanpour, on Wednesday.

“There are lots of things at stake,” he said from Kiev. “The European, or the civilized, future of Ukraine; but most of all, actually, is the question of rule of law.”

“For 23 years there was no rule of law in the country, nobody was respecting the laws, and actually the laws were used to punish the enemies.”

President Yanukovych, in power since 2010, is using those same tactics to punish his enemies, Kurkov said.

There is no sign that protestors, hunkered down since November in far-below-freezing temperatures, are ready to quit.

At least four people have been killed since the protests began, when the president reversed a decision to sign a long awaited trade deal with the EU.

“There is a big a split – bigger split than it was before – and the split was created by the politicians,” Kurkov said.

When demonstrations first started, he claimed, the government bussed people in from the Eastern part of the country and paid them to take part in the demonstrations as a way of portraying the protests as a battle between “two ways of thinking.”

Ukraine’s first post-independence president, Leonid Kravchuk, warned on Wednesday that the country was on the “brink of civil war,” but Kurkov called that an exaggeration.

The government has blamed unrest on foreign interference; Kurkov said that any foreign meddling has come from Russia, which supports the government, no one else.

“Most of [the protestors] came from small towns and villages in the Western part, in central part of Ukraine,” he said.

Many do not even understand what the idea of “Europe” means – for them the protests are no longer about a free trade deal, but about “this government, the corruption, the lack of rule of law.”

Kurkov, who lives just a few hundred meters from the main Independence Square where demonstrators are camped out, said that everyday life in Kiev has remained normal.

But in the square, where many protestors now wear makeshift armor, “there is a kind of wartime zone,” he said.

“They are very traumatized psychologically, people who are staying here for two months.”

In the beginning, he explained, protestors readily spoke to strangers. Now, they hide their faces – “they are very gloomy.”

They don’t expect anything good, he said, either from the government or from the opposition that has taken up the protestors’ cause.

“If [the] president finally promises early elections, for example – not 2015, March, as it is planned, but the end of 2014 – maybe that would be enough to stop the protests,” he said.

amanpour.blogs.cnn.com/2014/01/29/andrey-kurkov-amanpour-ukraine-civilized-future/?sr=sharebar_facebook